• Alexa Mantifel

  • Melody Wise

  • Anika Bousquet

  • Alexa Mantifel

    Undergraduate Researcher

    Alexa is a third year student pursing a Bachelor of Science (Honours) at Queens University majoring in Environmental Science, and receiving a certificate in Geographic Information Systems. Her academic interests include global climate, and environmental justice.

    Melody Wise

    Undergraduate Researcher

    Melody is a third year student at Queen’s University, where she is majoring in Global Development and minoring in Indigenous Studies. Her research interests include cultural politics, critical surveillance studies, political ecology, and settler colonialism.

    Melody has been with the HEC lab since the fall of 2018, and looks forward to continuing to work with the lab as an undergraduate research assistant in the winter term.

    Anika Bousquet

    Undergraduate Researcher

    Anika is a first year student pursuing a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Politics, Philosophy, and Economics. Her passion for indigenous affairs in Canada and work with a local elder facilitating Kairos Blanket Exercises led to her introduction to Dr. Castleden and the HEC lab in her first months at Queen's. She is looking forward to being a part of the lab over the next few years and exploring connections between her fields of study and those of the lab.

    Alexa Mantifel

    Undergraduate Researcher

    Alexa is a third year student pursing a Bachelor of Science (Honours) at Queens University majoring in Environmental Science, and receiving a certificate in Geographic Information Systems. Her academic interests include global climate, and environmental justice.

  • Madilyn Darrach

  • Jia Lin

  • Jonathan Aarssen

  • Sharon Yeung

  • Madilyn Darrach

    Master of Public Health Graduate Researcher

    Coming to the HEC lab from the Department of Public Health Sciences, Madilyn is a graduate settler scholar. She completed her undergraduate degree at Queen’s University with a major in Political Studies and a minor in History. Madilyn’s interests lie in studying systemic and gender-based violence, which led her to pursue a Master of Public Health to explore the implications of violence on health and wellbeing, especially regarding Indigenous and other marginalized populations. Madilyn is currently working with the HEC lab on a project that explores how Public Health Sciences departments are responding to Calls 18-24 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

    Jia Lin

    Master of Public Health Graduate Researcher

    Jia is a Master of Public Health student interested in systems solutions, vulnerable and/or marginalized populations and health equity. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto, having majored in neuroscience and sociology, and minored in psychology. Coming to the HEC Lab, Jia is working on her practicum researching Canadian PHS Programs’ responses to the TRC health-related Calls to Action. Outside of school, Jia enjoys reading, running and travels as much as she can.

    Jonathan Aarssen

    Graduate Student (Masters of Arts)

    Jon is currently completing a Master of Arts degree in Geography at Queens University, and joined the HEC lab in January 2017.  While completing a Bachelor's degree in Geography at Queens University, Jon developed a specific interest in Canadian Indigenous historical and cultural geographies, as well as the use of film and Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) methodologies as a way of engaging with and involving participant communities and interest groups in the research process. Some of these interests originate from a combination of previous training as a photographer/videographer, and time spent serving a documentary film project as camera operator, sound technician, editor, director of photography, and co-producer while an undergraduate.

    Jon's research interests broadly defined, relate to the historical and contemporary implications and effects of colonial experiences on Indigenous survival and cultural resilience, particularly as they are learned about through the use of participatory, arts-based methodologies that communicate research findings in geography and the humanities in an optimal manner.  Jon is interested in interdisciplinary, collaborative projects that uncover and trace connections within and between academic disciplines, especially those that pertain to historical, environmental, social, and health-related issues, inequities and injustices.

    Sharon Yeung

    Graduate Student Masters of Science/PhD/MD Program

    Sharon began working with the HEC lab in fall 2016. Since then, Sharon has been involved with various projects including the ‘You go to the emergency, you are treated like dirt’ research project and the First Nations Cohort of the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds. Sharon is enrolled in the MD/MSc program and is currently completing her Master of Science in Epidemiology. Her thesis research explores the resilience and strengths of Indigenous communities across Canada and specifically examines the positive relationship between social capital and well-being outcomes. Sharon’s research is supported financially by a Frederick Banting and Charles Best CGS Master’s Award and importantly, by the priceless time and energy of the Indigenous communities that have guided her journey.

    Select Publications

    Yeung, S., Bombay, A., Walker, C., Denis, J., Martin, D., Sylvestre, P., & Castleden, H. (December 18, 2018). Predictors of medical student interest in Indigenous health learning and clinical practice: a Canadian case study. BMC Medical Education, 18(1), 307.

    Madilyn Darrach

    Master of Public Health Graduate Researcher

    Coming to the HEC lab from the Department of Public Health Sciences, Madilyn is a graduate settler scholar. She completed her undergraduate degree at Queen’s University with a major in Political Studies and a minor in History. Madilyn’s interests lie in studying systemic and gender-based violence, which led her to pursue a Master of Public Health to explore the implications of violence on health and wellbeing, especially regarding Indigenous and other marginalized populations. Madilyn is currently working with the HEC lab on a project that explores how Public Health Sciences departments are responding to Calls 18-24 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

  • Paul Sylvestre

  • Nicole Goodbrand

  • Chad Walker

  • Sarah Rotz

  • Paul Sylvestre

    Graduate Student (PhD)

    A SSHRC funded doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s University, Paul’s doctoral research explores the changing landscape of urban governance and land-use planning in the context of assertions of Indigenous jurisdiction and land rights over, and in, urban spaces. In particular, he is interested in the political work accomplished by discourses of reconciliation and enactments of private property in post Tsilhqot’in Canada. Paul continues to be fortunate in having many patient and generous teachers, guides, and mentors to support him through this work.

    Select Publications

    Castleden, H., Hart, C., Martin, D., Harper, S., Cunsolo, A., Sylvestre, P., Day, L., Stefaneli, R. (2017). Implementing Indigenous and western knowledge systems in water research and management (part 2): Interviews with collaborative teams to overcome the limitations of literature reviews to inform water policy in Canada. International Indigenous Policy Journal (In press).

    Castleden, H.,  Sylvestre, P., Yeung, S. (2017). “I honestly don’t think I learned anything about Indigenous peoples”: Understanding medical school preceptors’ and students’ knowledge and attitudes towards Indigenous peoples and Indigenous health. (Prepared: target journal- Medical Education)

    Sylvestre, P., Castleden, H., Martin, D., & McNally, M. (2017). “Thank you very much… You can leave our community now.”: geographies of responsibility, relational ethics, acts of refusal, and the conflicting requirements of academic localities in Indigenous research. ACME: A Critical E-Journal of Geography

    Nicole Goodbrand

    Graduate Student (PhD)

    Nicole is a settler scholar pursuing a doctorate (Ph.D.) in Geography at Queen's University. She is originally from what is known today as Brantford, Ontario, on the traditional territory of the Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee peoples and next to both Six Nations of the Grand River and Mississaugas of the New Credit. Her memories and experiences as a child both in a community influenced by colonization and Indigenous/Non-Indigenous relationships drove her to pursue an education to try to begin to understand the complex relationship in which Canada has with Indigenous peoples and to try to find ways to better honour our treaties and promises. Her previous Master's degree in Planning focused on the current state of the practice of land use planning in relation to Indigenous/non-Indigenous relationships and relationship building in Southern Ontario. She is supervised by Dr. Heather Castleden and continues to focus on post treaty relations through community based participatory research focused on urban Indigenous health.

    Chad Walker

    Post Doctoral Fellow

    Google Scholar

    Following his graduate degrees at Western University, Chad came to Queen's and joined the HEC Lab in September of 2017. He is a proud member of the A SHARED Future team, where his research involves diverse methodologies and datasets aimed at increasing our understanding of renewable energy and its potential role in reconciliation efforts in Canada. Of particular import is Chad's role in research collaboration with First Nation community partners to investigate issues of energy autonomy, health and local sustainability of wind energy development in Atlantic Canada.

    Select Publications

    Stefanelli, R., Walker, C., Kornelson, D., Lewis, D., Martin, D., Masuda, J., Richmond, C., Root, E., Tait Neufeld, H., & Castleden, H. (2018) Renewable energy and energy autonomy: How Indigenous peoples in Canada are shaping and energy future. Environmental Reviews.

    Yeung, S., Bombay, A., Walker, C., Denis, J., Martin, D., Sylvestre, P., Castleden, H. (2018). Predictors of medical student interest in Indigenous health learning and clinical practice: A Canadian case study. BMC Medical Education, 18 (1), 307. 

    Walker, C., Stephenson, L., & Baxter, J. (2018). "His main platform is 'stop the turbines!'": Political discourse, partisanship and local responses to wind energy in Canada. Energy Policy, 123, 670-681.

    Sarah Rotz

    Post Doctoral Fellow

    Sarah Rotz is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Geography at Queens University as part of the CIHR funded 'A SHARED Future' project. As a settler scholar-activist, Sarah's work focuses on political ecologies of land and food systems, settler colonial patriarchy, and concepts of sovereignty and justice related to food, water and energy, and the ecosystems that support them. Sarah has a PhD in Geography from the University of Guelph and has published on topics ranging from the political economy of farmland tenure and critical perspectives of big data in agriculture, to the ways that settler colonial logics and gendered narratives uphold extractive practices and relationships on the land. Her current research critically explores how settler and Indigenous relationships are emerging through land-based, Indigenous food and energy sovereignty projects across Canada.

    Paul Sylvestre

    Graduate Student (PhD)

    A SSHRC funded doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s University, Paul’s doctoral research explores the changing landscape of urban governance and land-use planning in the context of assertions of Indigenous jurisdiction and land rights over, and in, urban spaces. In particular, he is interested in the political work accomplished by discourses of reconciliation and enactments of private property in post Tsilhqot’in Canada. Paul continues to be fortunate in having many patient and generous teachers, guides, and mentors to support him through this work.

    Select Publications

    Castleden, H., Hart, C., Martin, D., Harper, S., Cunsolo, A., Sylvestre, P., Day, L., Stefaneli, R. (2017). Implementing Indigenous and western knowledge systems in water research and management (part 2): Interviews with collaborative teams to overcome the limitations of literature reviews to inform water policy in Canada. International Indigenous Policy Journal (In press).

    Castleden, H.,  Sylvestre, P., Yeung, S. (2017). “I honestly don’t think I learned anything about Indigenous peoples”: Understanding medical school preceptors’ and students’ knowledge and attitudes towards Indigenous peoples and Indigenous health. (Prepared: target journal- Medical Education)

    Sylvestre, P., Castleden, H., Martin, D., & McNally, M. (2017). “Thank you very much… You can leave our community now.”: geographies of responsibility, relational ethics, acts of refusal, and the conflicting requirements of academic localities in Indigenous research. ACME: A Critical E-Journal of Geography

  • Vanessa Sloan Morgan

  • Marc Calabretta

  • Dr. Diana Lewis

  • Dr. Jeff Masuda

  • Vanessa Sloan Morgan

    Research Associate

    Vanessa has worked primarily within Heather and Huu-ay-aht First Nations' longstanding research partnership since 2010. During that time, we have focussed on the modern treaty process to create digital stories with Huu-ay-aht youth and to highlight how relationships between modern treaty signatories shift during the first years of treaty implementation through the 'Our Journey, Our Choice, Our Future' research project. Having completed a doctoral degree at Queen's in 2017, Vanessa is now a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Northern British Columbia. She continues to work with the Huu-ay-aht and Heather on co-designed research projects.

    Marc Calabretta

    Research Program Manager

    Marc has been working with the HEC Lab since the autumn of 2015. Since then, Marc has worked with Heather, Vanessa, and Jon on the 'Our Journey, Our Choice, Our Future' research project. His Masters work focused on examining archival documents held by Huu-ay-aht First Nations to gain a comprehensive understanding of the modern treaty negotiation process. In doing so, the research not only looks to provide greater understanding into the process itself, but also to gain insights into how Huu-ay-aht First Nations negotiated Treaty successfully. Marc defended his thesis in October of 2017, and has since transitioned into the role of Research Program Manager for the HEC Lab.

    Dr. Diana Lewis

    Research Associate

    Diana Lewis is Mi'kmaq from Sipekne'katik First Nation in Nova Scotia, and holds a Master of Resource and Environmental Management degree. Her PhD research focuses on resource development, and the impacts of resource development on the health of Indigenous peoples, using a methodology that combines both Indigenous and western-based sciences. For the past seven years, her research has focused on the impacts that a pulp and paper mill has been having on the health of Pictou Landing First Nation. Government has never investigated the health concerns of the community, despite the community being exposed to contaminants for 50 years. The community had no baseline health data to evidence how the community has been impacted over the years. Together, with the women of the community, Lewis developed an environmental health survey to collect data for the community , using a methodology guided by the principle of Etuaptmumk, or Two-Eyed Seeing, which calls upon researchers to approach research using Indigenous knowledge and Western knowledge, drawing upon the strength of both approaches. Diana is Co-Director of the A SHARED Future (Achieving Strength, Health, and Autonomy through Renewable Energy Development) research program.

    Dr. Jeff Masuda

    Research Associate

    Dr. Jeff Masuda is a human geographer trained in the sub-discipline of health geography as well as the interdisciplinary fields of health promotion and population health. He is an Associate Professor at Queen's University and holds a joint appointment in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies and the Department of Geography. His graduate studies focused on health and sustainable transportation (MSc) and community participation in environmental governance (PhD). Between 2010 and 2014 Jeff was the recipient of an esteemed CIHR New Investigator Award in Knowledge Translation and he is the founding Director of the Centre for Environmental Health Equity.

    Vanessa Sloan Morgan

    Research Associate

    Email: vanessa.sloan.morgan@unbc.ca

    Vanessa has worked primarily within Heather and Huu-ay-aht First Nations' longstanding research partnership since 2010. During that time, we have focussed on the modern treaty process to create digital stories with Huu-ay-aht youth and to highlight how relationships between modern treaty signatories shift during the first years of treaty implementation through the 'Our Journey, Our Choice, Our Future' research project. Having completed a doctoral degree at Queen's in 2017, Vanessa is now a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Northern British Columbia. She continues to work with the Huu-ay-aht and Heather on co-designed research projects.