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Queen’s University is situated on traditional Anishnaabe and Haudenosaunee Territory

Research for the HEC of It!

The Health, Environments, and Communities Research Lab, situated on the unceded traditional territories of the Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe Peoples at Queen’s University, is a qualitative research lab that focuses on producing justice-oriented research that contributes to pathways of social, environmental, and health equity. With a specific focus on Indigenous health and well-being, two-eyed seeing, community-based participatory research, and digital methods, the HEC Lab is a dynamic space where highly qualified personnel are trained and mentored to produce first class research.

Graduate Student Supervision

If you are interested in applying to work with Heather in the HEC Lab at Queen’s University, we encourage you to email Heather with a statement of interest, an up to date copy of your CV, a copy of your unofficial transcripts, as well as an exceptional piece of writing you would like to share. If research interests align, Heather would be happy to chat about graduate supervision prospects or discuss the potential to work on funded graduate projects.

You can learn more about Graduate Studies in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s University here

Heather Castleden

Heather Castleden is a white Settler scholar-ally, trained as a health geographer. She undertakes community-based participatory research (CBPR) in partnership (often) with Indigenous peoples, communities, organizations, and Nations, on their priority issues that fall within her thematic areas of expertise: the nexus of cultures, places, power/resistance, and relational ethics.

View Heather’s Bio »

Research for the HEC of It!

The Health, Environments, and Communities Research Lab, situated on the unceded traditional territories of the Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe Peoples at Queen’s University, is a qualitative research lab that focuses on producing justice-oriented research that contributes to pathways of social, environmental, and health equity. With a specific focus on Indigenous health and well-being, two-eyed seeing, community-based participatory research, and digital methods, the HEC Lab is a dynamic space where highly qualified personnel are trained and mentored to produce first class research.

Current Projects

A SHARED Future

The Achieving Strength, Health, and Autonomy through Renewable Energy Development for the Future (A SHARED Future) program of research is about reconciliation between knowledge systems is about reconciliation between knowledge systems; it must be foundational to our work together

From this premise, renewable energy is our chosen platform for exploring reconciliation and moving towards healing our relationships with each other and the world around us. Our goal is to bring forward stories of reconciliation and healing in intersectoral partnerships under the umbrella of renewable energy conservation, efficiency, and development. In doing so, we wish to bring to light new and restored understandings of integrative health by sharing our stories, resources, and tools with Indigenous and Settler governments, industries, ENGOs, universities, and beyond.

The A SHARED Future Research Program supports several thematically-linked projects across Canada that will study various types of intersectoral partnerships, with an overall focus on Indigenous peoples’ leadership in renewable energy conservation, efficiency, and development. You can learn more about the A SHARED Future research program and the various projects here.

Current Projects

Our Ancestors are in our Lands, Waters, and Air

To date we have been researching the impacts of the pulp and paper mill in the estuary adjacent to the community of Pictou Landing First Nation, known as A’se’k, which provided us with the foods, medicines, transportation, shelter, and tools we have needed to survive and thrive since time immemorial. Now we want to (1) share our novel health-related knowledge vis-à-vis a documentary film about our integrative research, and (2) using the film as a catalyst, investigate how university-based and community-based researchers across disciplines, professions, and sectors can begin to conceptualize a Two-Eyed Seeing approach in their own research in the spirit of healing and reconciliation in Indigenous health.

Current Projects

Tasii?akqin ?uyaqhmisukqin

Tasii?akqin ?uyaqhmisukqin is the continuation of a long-standing research collaboration with Huu-ay-aht First Nations, one of the five First Nation signatories of the Maa-nulth Treaty. Since 2005, various sources of SSHRC funding have supported the undertaking of a community-driven comprehensive study about the multi-faceted experiences of becoming a Modern Treaty Nation, contributing to the negotiation process and the early years of the implementation journey from community perspectives.

The goal of this new research project is to identify, document, and critically understand and analyze how Huu-ay-aht citizens are experiencing the first decade of implementation as the Nation prepares for the 2026 ‘Periodic Review’ of the Maa-nulth Treaty. Accordingly, our research would run alongside the Huu-ay-aht implementation pathway. In doing so, our study is intended to first contribute to Huu- ay-aht First Nations’ ability to adequately and effectively implement its Final Agreement, second to add to academic critiques of modern treaties, and third to contribute to policy and process alternatives.

Current Projects

Relational Accountability

Relational Accountability